Healthy Aging at all Stages of Life

Gluten, Gut and Immune Function

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email
According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, Gluten is: a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It helps food hold its shape, acting as a glue. Gluten can be found in many foods, most of which you’d never consider containing it.
While gluten is a building block of food, some people cannot tolerate it in their diets, many of those same people becoming violently ill upon ingesting gluten. Because we understand that gluten can cause severe issues, we wanted to make sure that even those who enjoy a gluten-free lifestyle can still enjoy the benefits of HUmineral products.
HUmineral nutrient supplement products are gluten-free, wheat-free, dairy-free, soy-free, sugar-free, fat-free, USA and non-GMO.

REFERENCE: Humic and Fulvic Acid Mineral contains a plethora of nutrients that improve gut health, including: trace minerals, electrolytes, fatty acids, silica (which boosts collagen synthesis), pre-biotics and probiotics. These help nourish the digestive tract and also boost the ability of “good bacteria” to repopulate and form a healthy “microbiome” environment. We need a strong digestive system to build immunity, help control hormone production, regulate our appetite, reduce our stress response and much more. As a result of gut permeability (when particles are able to escape through the gut lining and enter the bloodstream where they should not normally be), inflammation is triggered and autoimmune reactions can occur. There is some evidence that consuming humic/fulvic acid mineral promotes a healthy intestinal tract and immune system (digestive disorders and other issues, including: SIBO symptoms, (small intestine bacterial overgrowth), inflammatory bowel disorders, bacterial infections (respiratory, urinary tract, etc.), or the flu and common colds.

REFERENCES: Kiefer D, Ali-Akbarian L (2004). “A brief evidence-based review of two gastrointestinal illnesses: irritable bowel and leaky gut syndromes”. Alternative Therapy Health Medicine 10 (3): 22-30. Pike, M. G.; Heddle, R. J.; Boulton, P.; Turner, M. W.; Atherton, D. J. (1986). “Increased Intestinal Permeability in Atopic Eczema”. Journal of Investigative Dermatology 86 (2): 101-104. Humbert, P.; Bidet, A.; Treffel, P.;Drobacheff, C.; Agache, P. (1991). “Intestinal permeability in patients with psoriasis”. J o u r n a l o f d e r m a t o l o g i c a l s c i e n c e 2 (4): 324-326. Vaarala O, Atkinson MA, Neu J (2008) ‘The “Perfect Storm” for Type 1 Diabetes The Complex Interplay Between Intestinal Microbiota, Gut Permeability, and Mucosal Immunity’, Diabetes Journal , (57) 10(2555-2562). Z Liu, N Li, J Neu (2005) ‘Tight junctions, leaky intestines, and pediatric diseases’, Acta Paediatrica, 94 (4), pp. 386-393. Maes M, Leunis JC (2008) ‘Normalization of leaky gut in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is accompanied by a clinical improvement: effects of age, duration of illness and the translocation of LPS from gram-negative bacteria’, Journal of Neuro Endocrinology, 29(6), pp. 90210. Visser, J (2010). Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permiability and Auto immunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms. Pub Med

HUmineral™ is committed to delivering consumers information and quality products that are from organic, natural and chemical-free sources in the form of whole foods and whole food supplements.

Follow us

Recent Post